TYCHOS Chapter 23 - distance to stars

Simon Shack's (Tycho Brahe-inspired) geoaxial binary system. Discuss the book and website for the most accurate configuration of our solar system ever devised - which soundly puts to rest the geometrically impossible Copernican-Keplerian model.
kalliste
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TYCHOS Chapter 23 - distance to stars

Unread post by kalliste »

These may be questions for Simon but anyone else who can correct my thinking go ahead.

So, the Alpha Centauri binary star system is 6.84 AU away but at 62 degrees to what we probably can't call the plane of the ecliptic any more but you know what I mean. The question that immediately leaps out to me then is were Alpha Centauri to have Jupiter sized planet orbiting it we should be able to see it... as maybe looking like a star in the night sky? Any decent sized planets of nearby stars should be visible to relatively achievable (i.e. interested amateur) telescopes?

Further, am I correct in assuming we can model bodies in the solar system orbits ignoring perturbations thanks to the nearby stars because their own movements average out somehow when we consider the gravity effects on bodies in the solar system?
kalliste
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Re: TYCHOS Chapter 23 - distance to stars

Unread post by kalliste »

https://images.immediate.co.uk/producti ... it=975,693

The link above is a picture of Saturn (9.6 AU according to NASA) taken with a $3,250 telescope by an amateur astronomer.
heniek1812
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Re: TYCHOS Chapter 23 - distance to stars

Unread post by heniek1812 »

kalliste wrote: Fri Sep 23, 2022 5:00 am These may be questions for Simon but anyone else who can correct my thinking go ahead.

So, the Alpha Centauri binary star system is 6.84 AU away but at 62 degrees to what we probably can't call the plane of the ecliptic any more but you know what I mean. The question that immediately leaps out to me then is were Alpha Centauri to have Jupiter sized planet orbiting it we should be able to see it... as maybe looking like a star in the night sky? Any decent sized planets of nearby stars should be visible to relatively achievable (i.e. interested amateur) telescopes?

Further, am I correct in assuming we can model bodies in the solar system orbits ignoring perturbations thanks to the nearby stars because their own movements average out somehow when we consider the gravity effects on bodies in the solar system?
I had no clue it was that close. At first I thought it was a mistake until I understood the angle aspect. I see no reason why any large planet around Alpha Centauri wouldn't be seen. I have a $800 telescope and I can see Saturn very well.
kalliste
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Re: TYCHOS Chapter 23 - distance to stars

Unread post by kalliste »

heniek1812 wrote: Sat Sep 24, 2022 7:11 am
I had no clue it was that close. At first I thought it was a mistake until I understood the angle aspect. I see no reason why any large planet around Alpha Centauri wouldn't be seen. I have a $800 telescope and I can see Saturn very well.
What detail can you see of Saturn? The proximity of the stars given by the TYCHOS model surely should mean some interesting pictures are possible with considerably more modest equipment than previously envisaged.
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Re: TYCHOS Chapter 23 - distance to stars

Unread post by heniek1812 »

kalliste wrote: Sat Sep 24, 2022 7:30 am What detail can you see of Saturn? The proximity of the stars given by the TYCHOS model surely should mean some interesting pictures are possible with considerably more modest equipment than previously envisaged.
With this baby I can see the rings and the larger satellites around it. Same goes for Jupiter. And I did this without using max magnification recently as the atmospheric condition were not optimal. Winter is best time, stable and dry atmosphere.
ASTELE™ 133.5 OTA LOMO Telescope
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kalliste
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Re: TYCHOS Chapter 23 - distance to stars

Unread post by kalliste »

https://www.constellation-guide.com/proxima-centauri/
Proxima Centauri is a red dwarf, too faint to be seen with the unaided eye. It has an apparent magnitude of 11.05. It was discovered by the Scottish astronomer Robert Innes in 1915.
If you're anywhere near Scotland you should be able to point your telescope at it at some point.

Surely someone can do better than this ...

https://esahubble.org/images/potw1635a/

...come to think of it, if someone can take a better, or even comparable, picture with an amateur grade telescope then that blows the whole NASA shenanigans completely out of the water.

Anybody know any amateur astronomers who can point their telescopes at Proxima Centauri?
kalliste
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Re: TYCHOS Chapter 23 - distance to stars

Unread post by kalliste »

Although the astronomer was Scottish, the observatory was the Union Observatory in South Africa. I'm too far north even where I am in the Philippines to see it and by quite a long way. Somebody needs to take a trip to South Africa with a telescope.

The plot thickens with this tomfoolery
https://learningenglish.voanews.com/a/i ... 96392.html
Fingers crossed it's because an amateur astronomer will get a great picture of Proxima Centauri and it will have to be officially decried as a fake.
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Re: TYCHOS Chapter 23 - distance to stars

Unread post by simonshack »

*
Dear kalliste - sorry for not responding to this thread of yours - but rest assured that I will do so in due time.
kalliste
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Re: TYCHOS Chapter 23 - distance to stars

Unread post by kalliste »

simonshack wrote: Sun Sep 25, 2022 10:30 pm *
Dear kalliste - sorry for not responding to this thread of yours - but rest assured that I will do so in due time.
Looking forward to it! The quickest way for TYCHOS to be confirmed empirically today is for an amateur astronomer with a consumer grade telescope to take "too good" pictures of close stars and given your hypothesis on how close Proxima Centauri really is it's the obvious candidate.
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Re: TYCHOS Chapter 23 - distance to stars

Unread post by patrix »

kalliste wrote: Tue Sep 27, 2022 1:10 am
simonshack wrote: Sun Sep 25, 2022 10:30 pm *
Dear kalliste - sorry for not responding to this thread of yours - but rest assured that I will do so in due time.
Looking forward to it! The quickest way for TYCHOS to be confirmed empirically today is for an amateur astronomer with a consumer grade telescope to take "too good" pictures of close stars and given your hypothesis on how close Proxima Centauri really is it's the obvious candidate.
Indeed. There's a lot of amateur astronomers and a good way to confirm the Tychos would be to find disagreements in planetary positions and their conjunctions with stars between official (NASA/JPL) data and the Tychos model and it's Tychosium, and then amateur astronomers verify which prediction that is the most correct.

And it would also be great to have some stellar parallax triangulations carried out with the assumption that Earth is not moving back and forth 300 million kilometres every six months, but only about 14000 kilometres each year in the same direction.
kalliste
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Re: TYCHOS Chapter 23 - distance to stars

Unread post by kalliste »

Watch this to the very end but be warned it's not for those with weak hearts


full link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_K3u0rEmOoo
patrix
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Re: TYCHOS Chapter 23 - distance to stars

Unread post by patrix »

Indeed. I saw that one a few years ago. If anyone thinks NASA is legit watch this. But so many want to believe, and shut their eyes to evidence like this, because if those were true, so many other uncomfortable questions arise. This video can even be found in this article from 2020 without a single mentioning of the laughably fake imagery at the end. The star in the perimeter of the Moon...Priceless :D
https://astronomy.com/news/2020/12/proj ... -astronomy

Edit: There's a discussion here. In the Flat Earth section of course. See, if you raise any concerns regarding NASAs activities. For example that most of their imagery is provably fake or that the way they claim their rockets creates thrust in space is physically impossible, then you're by definition someone that cannot understand that Earth is a rotating sphere...
https://www.metabunk.org/threads/nasa-s ... ect.11403/
kalliste
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Re: TYCHOS Chapter 23 - distance to stars

Unread post by kalliste »

What I take from the video is that even back then they were faking the public into thinking things that weren't real were real. They left it to seem like that was a picture of space taken by the Stargazer and they've been pulling that crap ever since, mixing photo retouch / CGI in with real footage seamlessly so you can't know where reality is. The other thing is that Stargazer Balloon hasn't left us any pictures or at least not any you can find on the intarw3bz. Somebody would need to hit the books, as in dead tree stuff. If I was still living in Edinburgh I would go into the National Library of Scotland and see what was published at the time, if anything.
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Re: TYCHOS Chapter 23 - distance to stars

Unread post by simonshack »

kalliste wrote: Thu Sep 29, 2022 11:45 pm What I take from the video is that even back then they were faking the public into thinking things that weren't real were real. They left it to seem like that was a picture of space taken by the Stargazer and they've been pulling that crap ever since, mixing photo retouch / CGI in with real footage seamlessly so you can't know where reality is.
You're making progress, dear kalliste ! :)

Sorry - no sarcasm intended, but I really have to wonder why you think that the ISS is real - and that it truly circles the Earth (in 'low orbit') every 92 minutes, at a speed of 25 X the Speed of Sound, without an engine - and only thanks to the 'inertia generated by the initial push' exerted upon its 'first modular component' that was supposedly launched back in 1998! :lol:

Surely, Santa's flying reindeers are far more credible than the ISS?

Image

https://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/ask ... on-travel-
kalliste
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Re: TYCHOS Chapter 23 - distance to stars

Unread post by kalliste »

They have something up there so people have something to see from the ground. All the stuff that's supposedly what's going on inside is fakery. As you know, I think rockets work to at least a limited extent in a vacuum. For all we know the anti-gravity tech that was all the rage in the 50s popular science magazines became a thing and went deep black. The extent of what has been kept hidden from us is, naturally, an unknown unknown.

This isn't just a modern thing. How did the Aztecs persuade their population to buy into pyramid building and mass human sacrifice? What mind control magic did the Ancient Egyptians use to persuade their population to construct the pyramids? Faking a moon shot or 9/11 with modern technology is way less impressive when you put them in context.

Anyway, back to the specifics of this thread. The picture of Proxima is the acid test for Simon's hypothesis. TYCHOS can be cemented with this one thing.
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