What is Gravity?

If NASA faked the moon landings, does the agency have any credibility at all? Was the Space Shuttle program also a hoax? Is the International Space Station another one? Do not dismiss these hypotheses offhand. Check out our wider NASA research and make up your own mind about it all.
Kopfhoerer
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Re: What is Gravity?

Unread post by Kopfhoerer »

SacredCowSlayer wrote: Mon Jul 27, 2020 9:12 pm Maybe I’m missing something here—but it doesn’t look like our member Kopfhoerer is trying to speculate about the shape of the earth. But rather, the comments appear to be more topic related—that being, “what is gravity?” That said, I truly got lost (or didn’t understand) the reference to “revolving in and out? Like a Wormhole?”
Thank you for clarification.

I do not stand by this thought. But for clarification:

- white circle: -> Earth
- red circles an arrows: -> magnetic field

- revolving in and out = turned inside out? (I dont know, how to put this better.)
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glg
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Re: What is Gravity?

Unread post by glg »

This thread is titled - What is Gravity?

Well, Gravity is Weight, nothing else - by definition.

Therefore the concept of Gravity rests only on weight and, ergo, Gravity violates Newtons first law of motion which postulates a necessary interaction of TWO forces acting on each other.

Newton knew that he violated his first law in respect to his theory on Gravity and accordingly made fun of himself and everyone else who to this day believes in Gravity as a law of Fundamental Interaction.

Here are Newtons thoughts:

"That one body may act upon another at a distance through a vacuum without the mediation of anything else, by and through which their action and force may be conveyed from one another, is to me so great an absurdity that, I believe, no man who has in philosophic matters a competent faculty of thinking could ever fall into it."

So far as I know, nobody to this day has successfully treated Gravity as Fundamental Interaction of two defined forces without abandoning alltogether the ONE supposed force of weight.
And those - like Einstein - who acknowledged weight being a force, did nothing else but rely on this singular force to bend the fabric of space and never defined any force whatsoever beyond that to adhere to Newtons first law of motion.

Classical physics always relies on an undefined force as placeholder/substitute for the neccessary interaction of two forces and therefore never proved Gravity a Fundamenntal Interaction.

So Gravity is no physical law yet, at least not beyond its meaning of being Weight and only Weight.

The title of this thread is misleading - tongue in cheek - as here, there are to be found a collection of thoughts pertaining to cause and effect which gravity alone cannot answer.
glg
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Re: What is Gravity?

Unread post by glg »

So what is Gravity if we stick to its singular definition?

Weight

Being in time - Istzustand - the path of least resistance - free fall.


Newton couldn't himself conceive of a one way force, something irrespective, regularly travelling in one indefinite direction without something else fundametally pushing It.
He.. must have known, the absurdity of motion in space against the endlessnes of space
Anathema to Newton, he consistently went so far as to fight even any least notion of such a celestial atonomous one way moving force, waged war against it, devised, f u n d a mental physical laws against the mere idea, which, even to this day cannot mentaly be violated down to the fabric on which everything seems projected.

By his mere character of cognition Newton though finally succumbed and never actually got past naming only that one singular objective apparancy of weight/gravity as an autonomous force acting quite alone and so, to act against it, by marriage, pre-invented a general undefined subjectivity - an additional, F o r c e , as proof of doctrin.

And what this means In reality and by exaxctly such implication, is that we still stand, as such that gravity constitutes a singular force for harvest, yet not for generating.



Must be frustrating.
patrix
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Re: What is Gravity?

Unread post by patrix »

Check this out. An excellent explanation of magnetism and Aether physics. This is the science of the future when it stops bending to the heliocentric dogma.


full link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JGIn45-rw7M

https://youtu.be/JGIn45-rw7M


full link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T-tEALIeU_0

https://youtu.be/T-tEALIeU_0
glg
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Re: What is Gravity?

Unread post by glg »

While pondering problems related to rockets in space and thereby juggling different concepts, I suddenly hit a peculiar rut in my thought process for which I didn't even know if it mattered much in my overall search for answers.
I thought mainly about buoyancy and gravity when I decided to revisit the problem of falling objects in a vacuum.
The question that arose is, if the center of gravity still played a role for falling objects in a vacuum?
I.e. if let's say I dropped a hammer in a vacuum chamber with the lightweight handle pointing towards earths center instead of the heavy head of the hammer whereabouts its own center of gravity would lay, would the hammer turn and torque towards its center of gravity while falling through the vacuum, or would it fall regardless of its center of gravity just the way I let it drop until it hit the ground?

As in a vacuum there is supposed to be no atmospheric resistance to any object falling through it, I concluded that such an object would be much unhindered to find its equilibrium in its center of gravity falling accordingly, but the following video seems to prove me wrong:


full link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jAvNQ5NkFnM

As anyone watching closely can clearly see, when the feathers are dropped in the air, plumes first, they start to turn so that their shafts, which are closer to the center of gravity of the feather, will point towards the ground.
But not so during the vacuum experiment(!) There the feathers remain just as they are dropped, plumes first.

So this would quite clearly suggest, that a vacuum cancels out the center of gravity of an object.
(?) That... or it proves that this experiment is likely a fake...
(?)
kalliste
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Re: What is Gravity?

Unread post by kalliste »

glg wrote: Mon Sep 26, 2022 2:07 pm But not so during the vacuum experiment(!) There the feathers remain just as they are dropped, plumes first.

So this would quite clearly suggest, that a vacuum cancels out the center of gravity of an object.
(?) That... or it proves that this experiment is likely a fake...
(?)
If the experiment is real then it kills my theory of how rocket engines work in the vacuum of space which includes relying on changes in the centre of gravity generating momentum as part of the mechanism.
https://www.cluesforum.info/viewtopic.p ... 0#p2416440
Although, in the absence of gravity we are considering inertial mass so is there such thing as a centre of inertial mass?
Thinking about it some more I don't think it's a long enough drop for the mechanism you propose to have a discernable effect on the feathers. When it's falling in air the feathers experience a lot of drag, it's not a moment of inertia.
glg
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Re: What is Gravity?

Unread post by glg »

kalliste wrote: Tue Sep 27, 2022 12:28 am
(..)Thinking about it some more I don't think it's a long enough drop for the mechanism you propose to have a discernable effect on the feathers. When it's falling in air the feathers experience a lot of drag, it's not a moment of inertia.(...)
I was waiting for exactly this reply, because a while after I wrote my comment I believe I fell into quite the same cognitive trap.

Precisely because there is no air resistance the search of an object for its center of gravity would be capable of being more profound and rapid - don't you think?

While you're at it, imagine a Badminton Shuttlecock. How high would you need to juggle it on your racket to make sure its bouncy center of gravity falls back onto the net of your racket?
15 centimeters maybe?


full link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wr7Mkr3eow4

Granted the Shuttlecock has a very pronounced CG so... would the Cox vacuum chamber be a long enough drop for the mechanism I propose, to, act by torque on the Shuttlecock if I choose to drop its feathery side first in a vacuum chamber?

Look,idptk. but I don't know much truly because despite the legacy of Galileo, the freakish Cox Video is the only test I know of that treats the subject visually in a supposedly decent setting.
It is laughable, utterly absurd and frankly sad to trust the science if science principles are treated like... like That.

But in the meantime I want a chicks feather, the smallest you can find in a good pillow and a heavy ass viking type hammer and I want to test them in the Cox concrete reinforced aluminum vacuum chamber chicks feather plumes falling first and hammer handle falling first - and GO!!!

Well though, I don't actually care at all right now if a Mosquito falls just as fast in a vacuum as an Elephant but, if a Shuttlecock falls all the way down center earth feathers first then, a Vacuum most definitely has the capability to cancel out the effect of center of gravity.

And that, makes me wonder why they call it ¨Center Of Gravity¨ when, Center Of Gravity (of an object) is renderd obsolete in conditions of almost perfectly pure unobstructed Gravity ? (!)



edited for some clarity
kalliste
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Re: What is Gravity?

Unread post by kalliste »

We're both being dumb I think. The centre of gravity is irrelevant because unless some external force disturbs it the body will keep moving in whatever orientation and direction, as per Newton. There's no lighter or heavier, that's the whole point of the experiment! The centre of gravity doesn't really exist, it's an averaging for mathematical purposes, and is only relevant in thinking about when (non-gravity) forces are acting on the object. Thinking about this has given me some crazy ideas about why gravity is seen but I'll have to do some more thinking. It's tricky because you've got to constantly not confuse concepts with actual things. With a shuttlecock, the drag forces act disproportionately to retard the feathers rather than the rubber end so the rubber end falls faster.
glg
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Re: What is Gravity?

Unread post by glg »

kalliste wrote: Tue Sep 27, 2022 9:08 am We're both being dumb I think. The centre of gravity is irrelevant because unless some external force disturbs it the body will keep moving in whatever orientation and direction, as per Newton. There's no lighter or heavier, that's the whole point of the experiment! The centre of gravity doesn't really exist, it's an averaging for mathematical purposes, and is only relevant in thinking about when (non-gravity) forces are acting on the object. Thinking about this has given me some crazy ideas about why gravity is seen but I'll have to do some more thinking. It's tricky because you've got to constantly not confuse concepts with actual things. With a shuttlecock, the drag forces act disproportionately to retard the feathers rather than the rubber end so the rubber end falls faster.
I just dropped a really heavy hammer with its handle pointing down from approx. half a meter and it almost instantly turned to its heavy side hitting the ground hammer head first.
And that's all because of molecular drag?
I simply remove those molecules and that hammer will fall just as I dropped it handle first for as long as the space surrounding it is in a state of vacuum or in other words if I dropped it in the Cox vacuum chamber ?
Really?
kalliste
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Re: What is Gravity?

Unread post by kalliste »

glg wrote: Tue Sep 27, 2022 11:10 am
kalliste wrote: Tue Sep 27, 2022 9:08 am We're both being dumb I think. The centre of gravity is irrelevant because unless some external force disturbs it the body will keep moving in whatever orientation and direction, as per Newton. There's no lighter or heavier, that's the whole point of the experiment! The centre of gravity doesn't really exist, it's an averaging for mathematical purposes, and is only relevant in thinking about when (non-gravity) forces are acting on the object. Thinking about this has given me some crazy ideas about why gravity is seen but I'll have to do some more thinking. It's tricky because you've got to constantly not confuse concepts with actual things. With a shuttlecock, the drag forces act disproportionately to retard the feathers rather than the rubber end so the rubber end falls faster.
I just dropped a really heavy hammer with its handle pointing down from approx. half a meter and it almost instantly turned to its heavy side hitting the ground hammer head first.
I just experimented with my 20 oz Estwing Claw Hammer and also a toilet brush and neither showed any tendency to favour the heavy end. I don't recall noticing this sort of behaviour and I've dropped a lot of things! The Estwing definitly has a heavier hammer end and is assymetrical. The only thing I can hypothesize is you're messing up releasing it somehow. The Estwing bounces a lot because the rubber handle and my toes are in danger! I encourage other members of the forum to expirement (cautiously) but I can't replicate the heavy end falls first behaviour. The objects drop remaining in the heavy end uppermost orientation as I expected.
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I'm with you though, we need access to that vacuum chamber to do a bunch of experiments
glg
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Re: What is Gravity?

Unread post by glg »

kalliste wrote: Tue Sep 27, 2022 12:01 pm The only thing I can hypothesize is you're messing up releasing it somehow.
Yes agreed.

If you drop the hammer in a position as far out of balance as possible it will gradually turn towards its heavy side and quicker as if you dropped it holding it somewhat more balanced but, as you are right with me messing up the release the distance it takes the hammer to torque is much more than half a meter.

Still, I agree with these guys:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JCxpkyu ... gSRDGRdkVg
And should they be right that would mean objects falling in a vacuum would gradually torque towards their respective center of gravity.
If these guys are wrong, then I guess falling objects like satellites in the vacuum of space must not worry about center of gravity ...
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